Study: No copays linked to lower blood pressure

No Copays, Easier-To-Take Medicine May Reduce Blood Pressure

Post to Facebook Study: No copays linked to lower blood pressure on USAToday.com: http://usat.ly/167UryK Incorrect please try again A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation Study: No copays linked to lower blood pressure Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press 4:08 p.m. EDT August 26, 2013 High blood pressure has been linked to strokes and heart attacks.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/08/20/copays-pills-blood-pressure/2678375/

Blood pressure

But two or more prescription drugs are often needed to bring high blood pressure under control. In 2001, the Kaiser group introduced a system-wide program involving its 1,800 primary care doctors to tackle the problem. It created a registry of adult members with high blood pressure, based on medical records. At the start, about 44 percent of 235,000 registry patients had their blood pressure under control. The registry grew and by 2009, the portion under control reached 80 percent of 353,000 patients.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/correction-blood-pressure-story/2013/08/22/2e5fb3aa-0b4c-11e3-89fe-abb4a5067014_story.html

Correction: Blood Pressure story

First, it helps with other risk factors for hypertension, like extra weight and stress. But exercise also improves the strength of your heart so that it can more effectively and efficiently pump blood, which lowers the pressure on the arteries. Stick To One Or Two Drinks Moderate drinking — one drink for women and men over 65 and two drinks for younger men — can actually help reduce blood pressure. But more than that has the opposite effect, according to the Mayo Clinic. Monitor Your Caffeine There is some evidence that caffeine can temporarily increase blood pressure, though it’s unclear if there is a long-term effect. The Mayo Clinic recommends checking blood pressure 30 minutes after a cup of coffee or caffeinated soda to see if the effect remains.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/21/reduce-blood-pressure-no-copay-easier-to-take-medicine_n_3789852.html

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